What is a chargeback, and why did I get one?

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognise a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorise a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Centre.

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

PayPal charges a fee to the seller when the buyer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer. If the transaction is protected by Seller Protection Policy, PayPal will cover the amount of the chargeback and waive the chargeback fee.